Check Memory Size and Memory Types on Linux Fedora using dmidecode Command



Configuration for GNU Linux Fedora Computer using Linux Command

 

     The dmidecode command example below execute in Linux Fedora to check memory size and memory type.  In Linux Fedora we can use the dmidecode command utility to retrieved the information from DMI or SMBIOS tables.  The example below show the step by step using dmidecode command on Linux Fedora to retrieve information about how much memory install and what type of memory install on our Linux Fedora machine.

Linux command example:

/usr/sbin/dmidecode --type memory

or  same as

dmidecode --type 5,6,16,17

 

The dmidecode --type memory could give the output on:

5     Memory Controller

6     Memory Module

16   Physical Memory Array

17   Memory Device

 

The output from dmidecode command below show information on each slot of memory module in Linux Fedora computer.

Display memory size in Linux Fedora using dmidecode command

[root@localhost ~]# dmidecode --type memory

# dmidecode 2.7

SMBIOS 2.1 present.

 

Handle 0x0500, DMI type 5, 24 bytes.

Memory Controller Information

            Error Detecting Method: 64-bit ECC

            Error Correcting Capabilities:

                        Single-bit Error Correcting

            Supported Interleave: One-way Interleave

            Current Interleave: One-way Interleave

            Maximum Memory Module Size: 512 MB

            Maximum Total Memory Size: 2048 MB

            Supported Speeds:

                        Other

            Supported Memory Types:

                        Standard

                        ECC

                        DIMM

                        SDRAM

            Memory Module Voltage: 3.3 V

            Associated Memory Slots: 4

                        0x0600

                        0x0601

                        0x0602

                        0x0603

            Enabled Error Correcting Capabilities:

                        Single-bit Error Correcting

 

Handle 0x0600, DMI type 6, 12 bytes.

Memory Module Information

            Socket Designation: DM1

            Bank Connections: 0 1

            Current Speed: Unknown

            Type: ECC DIMM SDRAM

            Installed Size: 128 MB (Double-bank Connection)

            Enabled Size: 128 MB (Double-bank Connection)

            Error Status: See Event Log

 

Handle 0x0601, DMI type 6, 12 bytes.

Memory Module Information

            Socket Designation: DM2

            Bank Connections: 2 3

            Current Speed: Unknown

            Type: ECC DIMM SDRAM

            Installed Size: 128 MB (Double-bank Connection)

            Enabled Size: 128 MB (Double-bank Connection)

            Error Status: See Event Log

 

Handle 0x0602, DMI type 6, 12 bytes.

Memory Module Information

            Socket Designation: DM3

            Bank Connections: 4 5

            Current Speed: Unknown

            Type: ECC DIMM SDRAM

            Installed Size: 128 MB (Double-bank Connection)

            Enabled Size: 128 MB (Double-bank Connection)

            Error Status: See Event Log

 

Handle 0x0603, DMI type 6, 12 bytes.

Memory Module Information

            Socket Designation: DM4

            Bank Connections: 6 7

            Current Speed: Unknown

            Type: ECC DIMM SDRAM

            Installed Size: 128 MB (Double-bank Connection)

            Enabled Size: 128 MB (Double-bank Connection)

            Error Status: See Event Log

 

Wrong DMI structures length: 1225 bytes announced, structures occupy 1219 bytes.

[root@localhost ~]#

 




3 comments:

Ralph said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

Thanks. I was looking for this command. This helped alot.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the article. It helped a colleague of mine who was trying to troubleshoot bad RAM modules in a blade server chassis. It enabled him to determine which module of a bank of 8 sticks was bad. Ain't linux wonderful?